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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Reproduction 12 years after seed-tree harvest cutting in Appalachian hardwoods found in the catalog.

Reproduction 12 years after seed-tree harvest cutting in Appalachian hardwoods

H. Clay Smith

Reproduction 12 years after seed-tree harvest cutting in Appalachian hardwoods

by H. Clay Smith

  • 281 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station in Upper Darby, Pa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Harvesting -- United States.,
  • Hardwoods.,
  • Trees -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby H. Clay Smith, Robert L. Rosier, and K. P. Hammack.
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research paper NE -- 350.
    ContributionsRosier, Robert L., Hammack, K. P., Northeastern Forest Experiment Station (Radnor, Pa.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination11 p. :
    Number of Pages11
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17645578M

      Defement cutting in eastern hard woods lthough deferment cutting is not a practice common in the United,States, it has been used in Eu- rope to harvest some forest stands. After a deferment cutting, the resid- ual stand resembles a seed tree cut; however, residual trees are not cut when the regenerated stand becomes :// Describes deferment cutting in yr-old, second-growth Appalachian hardwood stands in the Monongahela National Forest, West Virginia. All areas were on northern red oak Quercus ://

    Witness tree data from early land surveys ( and ) conducted in the same watershed were used to gain some insight into species frequency prior to and after initial ://   The seed production efficiency (SPE) at CAB increased by ca. 40% the first year after timber harvest (AC 1) and decreased to pre-timbering SPE rates by the third year after timber harvest (AC 3). Meanwhile, no change in SPE was seen in the LAW population in any of the years following ://

    Deferment cutting in central Appalachian hardwoods: an update. hardwood stands 10 years after a two-age regeneration harvest. Regeneration harvests cut all stems inch d.b.h. and larger   For the southern Appalachian Mountains U.S.A., the development of a stand of cove hardwoods dominated by yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) is described beginning with its inception after clearcutting in , followed by a severe fire in , and a cleaning in No subsequent treatments were imposed; natural mortality was the only factor affecting stand


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Reproduction 12 years after seed-tree harvest cutting in Appalachian hardwoods by H. Clay Smith Download PDF EPUB FB2

Appalachian hardwood forest 12 years after a seed-tree harvest cutting. In the study, made on the Fernow Experiniental Forest near.

Parsons, West Virginia, the fol- lowing aspects of reproduction were studied: 1. Size, number, and distribution of stenis. Species conlposition. Stem quality. EfTects of ea1*1~~ cultural trei~tments.

:// Description Woody reproduction 12 years after a seed-tree harvest cutting was evaluated for three central Appalachian hardwood sites in West Virginia, including species composition; size, number, and distribution; stem quality; effects of early cultural treatments; and influence Reproduction 12 years after seed-tree harvest cutting in Appalachian hardwoods book  › Home.

Reproduction 12 years after seed-tree harvest cutting in Appalachian hardwoods. Upper Darby, PA: Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Abstract.

Cover title."ODC "Bibliography: p. Mode of access: Internet Reproduction 7 years after seed-tree harvest cutting in Appalachian hardwoods. Upper Darby, Pa.: Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, (OCoLC) Get this from a library. Early reproduction after seed-tree harvest cuttings in Appalachian hardwoods. [G W Wendel; George R Trimble, Jr.; United States. Department of Agriculture.; United States.

Forest Service.; Northeastern Forest Experiment Station (Radnor, Pa.)] -- S2Even-aged management is gaining wide-acceptance in eastern hardwoods because it offers the promise of increased timber ://   reproduction 7 years after seed-tree harvest cutting in appalachian hardwoods contents introduction 1 study areas and methods 2 results 4 abundance of commercial species 4 distribution of commercial species 7 species composition 7 reproduction quality 9 noncommercial species valuable to wildlife 12 indicated potential effect of   GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS: Sourwood is a native, deciduous, medium-sized tree, 40 to 60 feet ( m) tall [13,30].It develops a slender trunk and small crown in dense stands.

In the open it forms a short, often leaning trunk dividing into several stout, ascending limbs [].The inflorescence is a raceme emanating from a central ://   Summer grape seedlings are abundant after tree harvest but are not as detrimental as sprouts to regenerating stands.

One year after clearcutting in West Virginia, there w summer grape seedlings per acre (,/ha). However, after 6 years, only vines per acre (/ha) were established in tree ://   GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS: Slippery elm is a native, medium-sized, deciduous tree reaching 60 to 70 feet ( m) on average sites and feet (41 m) on the best sites.

In the forest, it has a straight bole with the trunk dividing into widespreading limbs high up the tree.

The crown is broad and rather flat :// GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS: Downy serviceberry is a tall, deciduous shrub or small tree, growing up to 30 feet (9 m) or more [].Its trunk is about 16 inches (40 cm) in diameter [].The maximum recorded height and diameter for downy serviceberry is 70 feet (21 m) high and 2 feet ( m) d.b.h.

[].Its branches are purplish when young but turn grey at   Description. A two aged regeneration method in which a new age class develops from seeds that germinate under overwood that is not microenvironment ranges from exposed to shaded depending on the number of residual trees retained.

This regeneration method modifies the seed-tree or shelterwood methods by omitting or indefinitely deferring the overwood removal or seed-tree In this book Rebecca gives you the strategies to take you from seed to harvest.

You will learn what it takes to go from desiring more to achieving more. It all starts with a seed, without a seed nothing can grow. There is MORE to life than what you see and now is the time to plant and produce a harvest   In the small-tree category, three of the six oak species were found on sites 7 years after reproduction cutting, only two oak species were found 1 and 17 years after reproduction cutting, and no small-tree oaks occurred on sites that were cutover 12 and 59 years earlier.

In the large-tree size classes, no oaks occurred on any of the ://   Sprouts can quickly outgrow seedlings. Three years after final harvest, a sprout may be 3m (10 ft.) while a seedling may be about m ( ft.).

Expect young hardwood stands to be approximately 12 meters (40 ft.) tall at 40 years, at which time a second thinning will be required to maintain good diameter Residual stand damage was assessed in 10 ac stands harvested with either a 12 in.

diameter-limit harvest, a 16 in. diameter-limit harvest or an establishment cut of the shelterwood :// The area is an industrial forest composed predominantly of Appalachian hardwoods 60–80 years old. We examined songbird abundances throughout the forest and nesting success on four 40 ha plots in    acres, SI 70 Treedacre 10 Years After Cut.

"a. Shavers Fork acres, SI 80 I'rc~dacre 10 Years After Cut RE W4 SM RO YP BB RM -- G Advanced Regeneration.I0 Years After Cut -- Advanced Regeneration: commercial tree species greater than I -foot tall and less than dbh 10 4.

Regenerating Woodland Stands Eli Sagor, Extension Specialist, University of Minnesota Melvin J. Baughman, Extension Forester, Retired, University of Minnesota John G. DuPlissis, Silviculture Program Coordinator, University of Minnesota Natural Resources Research Institute Reviewed and revised in by Eli Sagor and John DuPlissis.

There are many reasons to harvest and regenerate a   reproduction were evaluated in four central Appalachian hardwood stands 10 years after a two-age regeneration harvest. Regeneration harvests cut all stems inch d.b.h, and larger except for 12 to 15 codominant residual trees/acre comprising 17 to 25 ft2basal area/acre.

After 10 years, codominants in the regenerated stand exhibited. 1. Introduction. Deferment cutting is a two-age regeneration method imported to the central Appalachian region from Europe in the early s (Smith and Miller, ).The practice was applied to Larix, Pinus, and Quercus-Fagus stands in Germany (Kostler,Troup, ) to improve the visual appeal of clearcuts, which served as the motivation for implementation in the Appalachian region as   Many oak stands are undergoing succession to mixed stands dominated by red maple.

Lack of disturbance is one factor in this process. Our research effort is trying to find disturbance regimes that will allow oak to successfully regenerate.

This will allow forest managers and landowners to develop mixed stands with a reasonable oak component in   established after a harvest cut from seed accumulated in the soil.

Studv Area * The study area is on the Fernow Experimental Forest near Parsons, West Virginia, maintained by the U.S. Forest Ser- vice, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. The present forest type is mixed Appalachian hardwoods with a site index for red oak of 74 feet at 50 Papers/Trimble et al WS 3 regeneration at.